Phoenix New Times

Susan R. Bolton, United States District Judge, recently presented a ruling that put into effect the pardon issued by President Donald Trump, to the former Sheriff of Maricopa County, Joe Arpaio.

As many of the citizens of Maricopa County spent years protesting the unethical and illegal practices implemented by the Sheriff’s Department under the direction of Joe Arpaio, there was, expectedly, noticeable outrage.

Michael Lacey, a longtime rival of Joe Arpaio, joined by his business partner, Jim Larkin, spoke out against the recent decision made by President Trump, and when discussing the leader’s relationship with the former sheriff, he referred to it as “a perfect marriage of two corrupt individuals.”

The longstanding war between Phoenix New Times and Joe Arpaio famously came to a head when the sheriff illegally had Larkin and Lacey arrested in their homes by deputies who’d arrived in unmarked vehicles and Mexican tags.

With the onset of the war in Vietnam, America became divided between the conservative supporters and the budding anti-war crowd. With tensions seemingly becoming thicker every day, the alternative community needed a voice that would represent the views of America that existed outside of the conservative world, and underground newspapers began circulating throughout many of the major cities in the United States.

The Kent State Shootings, which resulted in four deaths from the student population, proved to be a breaking point for Michael Lacey, and several others, such as Frank Fiore, Karen Lofgren, and Hal Smith.

In 1970, the inaugural issue of Phoenix New Times was published, to much local acclaim. Over the course of the next few years, Jim Larkin, already married with children, would come aboard, helping to steer the marketing campaign of Phoenix New Times, which proved to be an essential asset to the newspaper’s future development. Read more: Michael Lacey | Twitter and Phoenix New Times | Wikipedia

By the end of the decade, Phoenix New Times had shaken a number of obstacles, due in part to the addition of several innovative columns, such as a personals section, as well as satirical comic strips, such as Honky Tonk Sue, which was created by Bob Boze Bell.

In 1983, a period of rapid expansion would ensue, beginning with New Times Media’s purchase of Patrica Calhoun’s Denver-area publication, Westword.

As the years passed, 17 publications would call New Times Media home, including influential newspapers such as Village Voice, Miami New Times, OC Weekly, LA Weekly, and Nashville Scene.

Jim Larkin and Michael Lacey would remain a part of New Times Media, until the end of 2012, when, after a run that lasted four decades, the duo that had brought the brand into the national spotlight, decided to step away.

Today, Larkin and Lacey concentrate much of their efforts in their Frontera Fund, which takes aim at the unethical practices geared at Latino Americans in Arizona.

They recently introduced a new brand to the world of journalism, with the launch of FrontPage Confidential, which continues the trend of protecting the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, that was first initiated with Phoenix New Times.